Ode to Wind

Standard
Wind Energy

Wind Energy (Photo credit: janie.hernandez55)

Every Month our electric company sends us through snail mail, a little simple paper magazine called Rural Montana.  Recently there was a poem by Carol Dismore, of Bozeman Montana. They also have their paper on a website. When you get to the link hit the arrow to the right twice the poem is in the center of the page called Ode to Wind. I wanted to share this poem with you as I thought it explained the wind here very well. If the wind can be explained. This area and the Eastern Side of Montana is known for areas of high winds.  It has been interesting to experience the winds here, we often joke turn the wind off at the wind switch.  Can you name one or two positives about the area that your living in and one or two negatives about the area? There’s also an article on Oil Out East, for the article hit the arrow to the right 5 times for those of you who are interested in the Hydraulic fracturing or more commonly known as fracking.  The oil boom in North Dakota is starting to spread there are concerns of it spreading to this part of Montana. There has been several  public meetings lately around the area on this topic.  The farmers and ranchers want to be informed and prepared for the possibility of Hydraulic fracturing moving this way. It is a complicated topic with a lot of money at stake.

Advertisements

9 responses »

  1. It’s funny here there seems to be no middle ground no gentle breezes. Either the wind is full bore of it’s turned off completly and all is still. Is it that way in North Dakota too? We may be taking a trip to North Dokota in the near future.

    • Yes–it’s pretty much like that in North Dakota, too. I remember being nearly whipped off my feet walking to schools when the winds were really strong. Of course, that was nothing compared to walking to school in the blizzards. 🙂

  2. I went to college in NW Ohio, and the wind sure blows in that corner of the state. Glaciers made it table-top flat, so no barriers for the roaring wind. And like your state … what a great place for a wind farm! BTW … are you doing better? 🙂

  3. Hi,
    We get some very strong winds in the part of OZ I live in as well, we call them westerley winds, and you do have to make sure there aren’t any loose objects around the yard. Tree branches have been known to go through glass doors etc. very strong winds, and can be dangerous as well.

  4. A very detailed topic. We have a wind farm not too far from us and the pros and cons have been very interesting.

  5. I love the wind. It makes me feel alive. The wind has many wonderful things to offer this world. We have to work together with the wind so we can all benefit. Where I live, people welcome the wind. It is the fires we get all worked up about. I really like the area I live in now. I also love my mountain house. I am thankful. 🙂 Hope all is well.

  6. I think the modern day windmills in your photo look splendid against the hills. People often object to wind farms on aesthetic grounds, but I can’t see why. If they work on economic grounds they must be better than fracking.

    • Yes good point about the windmills being better than fracking. We have several wind farms near by. Along side a road in a small near by town the have one blade in a park seeing the blade alone on the ground close up it’s easy to see just how big the windmills are.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s